13 IDIOMATIC EXPRESSION USED IN DAY TO DAY ACTIVITY AND THEIR MEANING

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IDIOMATIC EXPRESSION AND THEIR MEANING

INTELLIGENCE UNDERSTANDING – LOGIC

 

1. Be on the ball

Meaning: If you are on the ball, you are aware of what is happening and are able to react to the situation quickly.

2. Bang your head against a brick wall

Meaning: If you bang your head against a brick wall, you continue vainly to try and achieve something in spite of several unsuccessful attempts. “I’ve been banging my head against a brick wall trying to explain the internet to my grandmother.”

3. Think better of something

Meaning: If you think better of something, you decide not to do something that you intended doing. “I wanted to go shopping, but when I saw the crowded car park, I thought better of it.”

4. It’s beyond me

Meaning: The expression “it’s beyond me” means: “it’s impossible for me to understand.” “It’s beyond mewhy Mary wants to marry John.”

5. Big picture

Meaning: To refer to the big picture means the overall situation, or the project as a whole, rather than the details. “While each aspect is important, try not to forget the big picture.

6. Blind you with science

Meaning: If someone tries to blind you with science, they confuse you with their knowledge by using difficult or technical words. “If you ask Tim for a simple explanation, he tries to blind you with science.”

7. I wasn’t born yesterday

Meaning: This expression is used to indicate that you are not as foolish or as easily deceived as some people seem to think. “Stop inventing silly excuses. I wasn’t born yesterday you know!”

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8. Brains behind something

Meaning: Someone who is the brains behind a project or action is erson thought to have planned and organized everything. “The police have arrested a man believed to be the brains behind the bank robbery.”

9. Build bridges

Meaning: If a person builds bridges between opposing groups, they help them to cooperate and understand each other better. Can’t make head or tail of something

10. make head or tail of it!”

Meaning: If someone can’t see the wood for the trees, they are so concentrated on the details that can’t see the situation as a whole. “The new manager found the situation so complicated that he couldn’t see the wood for the trees.”

11. Put on your thinking cap

Meaning: If you tell someone to put their thinking cap on, you ask them to find an idea or solve a problem by thinking about it. “Now! here’s this week’s quiz – it’s time to put your thinking caps on!”

12. Not have a clue

Meaning: If you don’t have a clue about something, you don’t know anything about it. “My wife’s grandmother’s maiden name? I don’t have a clue!”

11. Collect one’s thoughts

Meaning: If you collect your thoughts, you try to think calmly and clearly in order to prepare yourself mentally for something. “Anne stopped to collect her thoughts before calling back the customer.”

12. Come to grips with something

Meaning: If you come to grips with a problem or situation, you start to understand or deal with it properly “After the initial shock, the patient began to come to grips with his illness.”

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13. Come to your senses

Meaning: If you come to your senses, you start to think clearly and behave sensibly. “She finally came to her senses and realized that public transport was faster than driving.”

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